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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 573 (some duplicates have been removed)
Bloomberg
Dec 9, 2013 11:00pm EST
time as u.s. students according to a new rank has american students ranked 21st in science and 26th in math. an hour of code initiative asked people to spend an hour coding. it kicks off computer science education week. it is sponsored by code.org. here is president obama. >> learning these skills are not only important for your future but for our country's future. if you want america to stay on the cutting edge, we need young americans to master the tools and technology that will change how you do just about everything. >> they are giving coding tips from entrepreneurs including this guy, mark zuckerberg. >> if i wanted to wish everybody on facebook a happy birthday by sending an e-mail, it might take more than a century to write out all the e-mails. with a few lines of code, i can have a system to send an e-mail to everybody on facebook. that is why they are valuable. >> joining us from san francisco is the cofounder of code.org. ali partovi. besides that from mark zuckerberg, what is the point of this? >> it is great to be here. you mentioned earlier that we are lagging in math and
CSPAN
Dec 5, 2013 4:00pm EST
testified before the house science committee on the agencies will science and technology activities. the committee examine the policy of transparency practices on clean air and water acts and hydraulic fracturing or cracking. we bring you that kerry now. i'm not [inaudible conversations] >> to commit inside space and technology will come to order. welcome, everyone to today's hearing entitled strengthening transparency and accountability within the environmental protection agency. we're going to recognize myself or fitness for a doping statement and then i'll recognize the ranking member for hers. the environmental protection agency like every other governmental institution should answer to the american people. everyone agrees we need to protect the environment, but we should do so in a way that is open and honest. democracy requires transparency and accountability. yet epa's justification for regulation are cloaked in secrecy i asked. it appears the epa been a lot of stretches of science to justify its own object disappeared americans impacted by the agency's regulations have a rig
CSPAN
Dec 5, 2013 6:00pm EST
industry to make sure that we understand how to answer those issues effective from a science perspective, and in a way that continues to maintain the availability of inexpensive natural gas that strengths the economy as well as help us reduce air emission. >> i appreciate that. i think it seems like a reasonable response. someone who asked you environmental law far long time. please, do what you can to work with the administration. so we don't have overlapping of potentially inconsistent regulations. very frustrating for the public. we want it to be done responsibly and in a way people can understand. thank you for being here. thank you, mr. chairman. >> thank you, mr. peters. >> the gentle mab from arizona. >> thank you. i only had two things i wanted to walk through. everyone in the committee with us here yesterday. i'm sorry, you're going hear the same stheem again. the large data bases that are used particularly in things like pm10 which is a big deal in the desert, southwest we have the thing called dirt. without grass on it. so it really does affect our lives. down to t
FOX Business
Dec 3, 2013 10:00pm EST
regions march to a nuclear breakout. also the latest math reading and science test scores of u.s. students with the new of american exceptional is somne and we will of the shocking statistics in the chalk talk. we will be right back. >> obama pushes the troubled health care plan. he says the matter how much it stinks it will not bewe repealed. we will talk to our guests who have a diagnosis of their own. next. [ male announcer ] here's a question for you. if every u.s. home replaced one light bulb with a compact fluorescent bulb, the energy saved could light how many homes? 1 million? 2 million? 3 million? the answer is... 3 million homes. by 2030, investments in energefficiency could help americans save $300 billion each year. take the energy quiz. energy lis here. [announcer]...if you think the best bed for one of you might be a compromise for the other one... [woman]ask me about our tempur-pedic. [announcer] they're sleeping on the newest tempur-pedic bed... the new tempur choice... [man]two people.two remotes. [announcer] firmne settings for the head,legs,and back... and with
PBS
Dec 3, 2013 6:00pm PST
old saw significant be a false huge national average and it comes to reading math and science according to a major report by the organization for economic cooperation and development. the only cds piece of the tables right islands irish team's fourth at two thirty four member countries and reading. take the pile irish teenager is every three years. the oecd measures the performance of fifteen year old students across sixty five countries this time round our fifteen year olds have done rather well. when it comes to meeting they've been placed fourth at the least cds fifty four member countries. right next to finance. in science they reap eighteenth place significantly above average as a big improvement on previous performance. it's a really good result in science but we're seeing in the name crew. unemployment is really calm about it after many years of investment into china in nineteen ninety nine when we change the science curriculum. and in case hasn't even the chance to post from a science curriculum. this is good news and it affirms the excellent book that's been done by s
Al Jazeera America
Dec 1, 2013 7:30pm EST
look at hardware. this is a show about science by scin histories. kyle hill is an engineer, and he's investigating head-to-head combat and cutting edge technology that can help to detect a concussion before it's too late. >> lindsay moran is an ex-c.i.a. operative. she was packaging that can one day replace polysterene. rachelle oldmixon specialises in behaviours. i'm phil torres, i study insects in peru. that's our team. let's do some science. ♪ music ] >> hi, guy, welcome back to "techknow." i'm phil torres, with rochelle, kyle and lindsay. kyle, the nfl paid over three-quarters of a million to settle a lawsuit. what was it about. >> there's a focus on the concussion problem. the nfl has thousands of place, and millions of players in youth and challenge football. i went to virginia tech to look at technology to test helmets and track hits on college and youth players. let's take a look. . >>> homecoming in the heartland. this is cornhusker county. nebraska university, the epicentre of college football. >> first big win. >> along with the tradition of football - come the hits. che
PBS
Dec 9, 2013 3:00pm PST
foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: the deal creating the world's largest airline became official today. american airlines emerged from bankruptcy to join with u.s. airways. the new carrier will operate under the american airlines name. the merger leaves four airlines controlling more than 80% of the american travel market. passengers won't see immediate changes to reservations or frequent flyer programs, and it remains unclear if the deal will mean higher fares. eight of the most prominent u.s. tech companies, including apple, google and facebook, are calling for tighter controls on government surveillance. they sent an open letter to president obama today, in the wake of revelationshat the government collects personal data from their networks. we'll hear from m
SFGTV
Dec 7, 2013 7:00pm PST
approve the construction o f a cafe in the west garden of the academy of sciences in golden gate park. >> supervisor mar? >> thank you, president chiu, i want to acknowledge that it's been a pleasure working on this, the staff of the california academy of science and is we have with this the general manager and kevin, monalele that have been wonderful to work with. the academy of sciences is beginning tomorrow, it is the season for science exhibit, but this is a project that is a low profiled structure which includes a cafe, it isn't really an expansion of the site but replacement of a temporary structure with a perm nept and attractive building, it allows us to see this sculpture that's hanging like floating like a cloud above it, it's called where land meets the sea and it will be much more visible with this new structure. the project will enrich the experience hosting the academy which lists countless families, not only from district 1 but throughout the city, i want to thank the land use submit tee for its unanimous support of this. i'll be out there tomorrow for the opening
Al Jazeera America
Dec 7, 2013 2:30pm EST
about science by this is a show about science by scin histories. scin histories. kyle hill is an engineer, and kyle hill is an engineer, and he's investigating head-to-head he's investigating head-to-head combat and cutting edge combat and cutting edge technology that can help to technology that can help to detect a concussion before detect a concussion before it's it's too late. too late. >> lindsay moran is an ex-c.i.a. >> lindsay moran is an ex-c.i.a. operative. operative. she was packaging that can one she was packaging that can one day replace day replace polysterene. polysterene. rachelle oldmixon specialises in rachelle oldmixon specialises in behaviours. behaviours. i'm i'm phil torres, i study insects phil torres, i study insects in peru. in peru. that's our team. that's our team. let's do some science. let's do some science. ♪ music ] ♪ music ] >> hi, guy, welcome back to >> hi, guy, welcome back to "techknow." "techknow." i'm phil torres, with rochelle, i'm phil torres, with rochelle, kyle and lindsay. kyle and lindsay. kyle, the nfl paid over kyle, the nfl paid ov
CNN
Dec 9, 2013 6:00pm PST
it asperger's disorder. but this is not a precise science with medicine. but for people who have it, it causes shyness, sometimes extreme shyness, and what a great story this is about this woman. she said you know, great relief now that she knows what is wrong with her. >> because i know her very well, actually, and i have stayed in contact with her. she is very bright, actually, very bright and very normal most of the time. but she suffers from a clear behavioral disorder which she was aware of without really knowing what caused it. and i think she feels great relief. >> she feels better and let's hope that she will be a little more forthcoming, not quite as shy. this has been the experience of other people. and particularly people -- >> well, this is a bit of a trip with darryl hannah, it was fascinating. >> is that what led to -- let me say suspicions, at least half diagnosis that you had asperger's syndrome when you were younger? >> it always has been an awkward fit, but definitely as i grow older i definitely learn how to -- how to deal with it better. >> fascinating stuff. let
CSPAN
Dec 2, 2013 7:00am EST
science on the game and the stories behind the game. and the reality is that the perception that's been created by the mass media with football over the last two years is almost in every instance wrong. in some cases just 180° wrong. i got into this genesis of writing "the war on football" was a study that was put together by the national institutes for occupational safety and health. national institutes ofnational f occupational safety and health federal scientist. they put together last year, they looked at every nfl player who was pension vested who played in the league between 1959-1980. so guys like lawrence taylor and joe theismann and walter payton and dick butkus, all these guys, about 35 other players who played in the league in those 30 or so years. the reason they looked at these players is because there's a wide suspicion in the public that nfl players die young, that they died in the '50s, that the game takes such a toll on their bodies that their health outcomes are just absolutely horrible. this is something that has been spread in the mainstream press. it's not lik
SFGTV
Dec 3, 2013 11:30pm PST
be incredibly useful. this is the role of life science it is why years ago mayor replenishing and newsom and now i get it add my years of support to build this incredible innovation center the life science center we we call mission bay and a dog patch. i want to give a shout out to j cross-examination morgan chase they'll given us a gift. that's incredibly wonderful (clapping.) and again, i think it nurtures the whole spirit of our city. this is the innovation capital of world. i keep saying that and every time i turn around there's another example that were this is the melting right here of what's been happening in mission bay it invites so much of our young talent to join the successful efforts of large and small companies the talent that uc provides. we only have a small role in the city we realize how important it is about timing. and when people need it our staff comes through with it. i thank todd and others who are working with him because when the call comes in we need something it act fast to keep the most memory done they're there they take me out every tuesday for a new
CSPAN
Dec 6, 2013 8:00pm EST
biggest research of biomedical science in the world. we want to understand how life works at the detailed levels and apply that in terms of coming up with new insights to prevent and treat disease. >> we support tens of thousands of grants across the country conducted by the world's most cutting-edge scientist in the united states who are working on cancer, aids and other drugs. we are on a roll but there is a bit of an issue with the cuts. >> let's learn about the history. your roots date back to the late 1700s. but you were formed in 1887 as part of the department of health and human services. what is your budget and how many people work for nih? >> the current budget is about $29 billion. the number of people that work on the campus is about 17,000. most of the work is done by grants we give to the institutions across the country and globally. 85% is spent there in the universities where you are hearing about medical breakthroughs. >> how long have you been with nih? >> i came here 20 years ago, steve. asked to come lead the human genome project. in 2003, they laid out all thr
CSPAN
Dec 6, 2013 7:00am EST
of biomedical research in the world. basicssion is to do science to understand how life works at the most detailed level and to apply that in terms of coming up with new insights that will prevent and treat disease. support tens of thousands of grants across the country, conducted by our world's most cutting-edge scientists in the u.s. who are working on things from cancer to hiv, two aides. you name it -- to aids. you name it. let's learn more about the history. your roots date back to the late of thebut you are part department of health and human services. what is your budget and how many people work for nih? guest: it is about $29 billion. the number of people who work about on the campus is 17,000. most of our work is done by the grants that we give to universities and institutions all over the country. not getur money does spent in bethesda, but gets spent in those great universities where you are hearing every day about medical breakthroughs. that is because nih supported the work. how long have you been at nih? guest: 20 years ago is when i got here. we were working on the hum
PBS
Dec 4, 2013 9:00am PST
and science studies. this tool provides a special time to go to the city meant to. it's been patient. listen to the computer science the mistake and made available to them. sports the same old students are able to progress the details in the race takes to stop the car on the stupid computer is acting to the top of that match my skin japanese companies have no clue the global race to recruit him. this sudoku killer bees to recruit me for saying more and more debt is at the start looking for good science graduates. the warm hearted comedy nice bt engineers has a plan to stay and grow. for the snow trying to build a connection with one of india's leading dance in unison. the institutional continue getting up to five games recruiters say european and american companies are only now starting to come here in oregon the ancient japanese firms are will position to snap up the bits you are different kinds. us soldiers led the new union team. you love it. this is a sin you could too bad it's good to eat. we want to attract talented people from india to help them learn how to work in ja
PBS
Dec 5, 2013 8:00pm PST
chairs the science of space and technology committee in the house criticized roles the epa said on the amount of carbon pollution new power plants were allowed to remain. this is the epa is way too slow or reverse the effects of climate change. a letter addressed to the head of the agency. lamar smith wrote the agency is a stubborn insistence on placing its judgment of biomass of that science advisers raises serious concerns that the apa is a roll making is based more on partisan politics and sound science but on wednesday a job for the stars with a two hour long hearing called astral biology the search for bio signatures in our solar system and the lines. this guy saying that is possibly just about life on other planets aren't possibility of june more than you the pope refused. what can we find hope and pray the atmosphere to the french who drive by of signatures that would indicate the presence of some form of gluten free life. what would be the implications of such a discovery. pics are now questioning the lamar smith concedes aliens as sound science but quiet change and partisa
PBS
Dec 2, 2013 4:50am PST
science of guns under the state's crisis. moral tomorrow you who might have on his own mind on the whole lot of cars all that good and it's a toss in some hours from my problems inside the city can or bottle up on this promise. once published a book about it. most of the home of the spots open to the seaside the superdome on the spot market that he couldn't pitch that was all that putting too much of a woman who bought these as the coconut cents. bodyguard i was recently got about six p lucky that got me back to the sea project in the northern province of body out. we have a ripple the dotted line is stepping up attacks on the hook days ahead of presidential elections due in a pinch when t for teen fattening security concerns as forty troops today to withdraw from the country by the end of next year. but cavity to until i get to see project the audubon still in god and show them. the booklet and equal in blogging the project and just one of the seven book has gone down so high the devil do was get up to security to fish in it's awfully to keep people safe at the windshield. she said the
NBC
Dec 3, 2013 5:00pm PST
homes and residents on treasure island. >>> creating science projects out of scrap. >> it's so cool and so weird and wacky and different. looking at them just gets you excited about, wow, what is that thing. >> how a local teach developed a nonprofit that helped thousands of classrooms. >>> protesters are putting pressure on the district attorney to throw the book at the officer who killed young andy lopez. i'll have a live report coming up. >>> seven weeks after the deadly shooting of a 13-year-old at the hands of a sheriff's deputy, changes could be headed to the county. some question whether if it's enough. we're live where a protest is underway tonight. >> reporter: protesters have gathered at a veterans building. they want the da to throw the book at the officer who killed andy lopez. the board of supervisors today signaled they're willing to support some reforms. >> i believe andy has given us the opportunity to build the community and improve quality of life. >> reporter: they're committed to making that happen. seven weeks after the fatal shooting of 13-year-old andy lopez b
PBS
Dec 4, 2013 1:00am PST
reading, math and science. what changes need to be made to ensure future generations can compete in a global economy? we have that and more tonight on "nightly business report" for this tuesday, december 3rd. >>> good evening everyone and welcome. i'm tyler mathisen. remember how great the month november was for stock investors, records and consecutive weeks of gains? hold that thought because so far december has gone the other way. fast. in fact, the dow and s&p 500 today ended lower for a third straight session. logging their biggest three-day decline in two months. some on wall street say stock prices are too high and they are taking profits and there is a pull back and this is the start of it, or maybe consumer spending, soggy so far this holiday season or the fed's seeing the blowout auto sales? we'll start pairing back on stimulus soon. whatever the reason the market sold off again today. the dow ending well off the lows of the session, however, nevertheless down 94 points and closing below 16,000, as you see there. the nasdaq was down eight and the s&p 500 lost five dipping bac
FOX News
Dec 8, 2013 12:00pm PST
, science, and reading. so how concerned should we be? there's a debate ahead. [ male announcer ] research suggests cell health plays a key role throughout our lives. one a day men's 50+ is a complete multivitamin designed for men's health concerns as we age. with 7 antioxidants to support cell health. one a day men's 50+. yep. got all the cozies. [ grandma ] with n fedex one rate, i could ll a box and ship it r one flat rate. so i kn untilt was full. you'd be crazy not to. is tt nana? [ male announcer ] fedex one rate. simple, flat rate shipping with the reliability of fedex. >>> well, another mediocre showing for students in the program for national student assessments global education scores which ranked 15-year-olds from around the world in reading, science, and math. this year's results shows the u.s., once again, in the middle of the pact. we're back with dan henninger and kim strassel. how seriously should we take an international ranking like this? >> i think we should take it seriously. some people will say, look, we are in the middle. we didn't necessarily fall very fa
SFGTV
Dec 9, 2013 11:00am PST
in san francisco. we know at the academy of science. i think that that the science is pretty clear folks speak it the science this is a scientific reality. so we' so we're looking at the offer lap especially in the regulating agrees we are going to need help and some kind of data and assistance if the goal is to address folks are going to what-do-you-call-it - there's a word called mail >> stamps. they're doing sentences with butterflies in it. i think it's important this is a process. i think 20e7b9d we're setting a process we're going to need some board support. and i think we can get there. this is a stationmaster of doing that. so i support with sxhoits is doing but, of course, we want to hear from the public first unless there's any more comments from the commission >> you know sometimes it's not what you do but how you do it. i like to finish it if wasn't for the restocking of those reservoirs you wouldn't be able to fish in some of those places. as a kid i'm a bonus lover so i'm the kind of person you know don't kill it i'll take it outside. i literally have a photo of pictu
Al Jazeera America
Dec 10, 2013 2:00pm EST
earth. 2 1/2 years after if completed if it is onboard are now focused on research, but science in space comes at a price, in this case, a hefty $150 billion for construction, and another $2 billion a year to keep it running. >> it was held with developing drugs for example, that chemical and biological reas in the absence -- and we can determine the way this takes place, and perhaps emphasize new drugs and cures for cancer, who knows. these are completely unpredictable. >> the states that combine the effort of the u.s. russian european space agencies and has been visited by astronauts from 15 different countries. but how does its cost compare to other big scientific projects? >> the large collider in southern france costs $10 billion to build. this year it discovers the particle a significant advance in the world of physics. compare that to $9 billion a year spent on research and cancer, and then there's nasa costly robotic mars rover. curiosity. the mission cos two preponderate $5 billion. >> rem on the space station has included looking a the prolongs effects of space on humans,
Al Jazeera America
Dec 8, 2013 7:30pm EST
science by scientists. let's check out our team of hardcore nerds. lindsey miran is a cia operative and analyst. tonight, high tech crime stoppers. shots fired in the night. cops pinpoint the crime scene. how do they do it? the new science of solving crime. crystal dilworth is a scientist. if you think wine making is old school, think good. the newest ways of making wine. >> a neuro scientist and i will phil tores, an entimologist. the by onic arm. see how it's more man-like than machine. that's our team. now, let's do some science. >> hey, guys, welcome to techknow where we bring you stories of innovation here in america. i am phil torres. i am here with michelle, crystal and lindsey. you went to one of the most violent cities in america to see how technology can help us fight crime? >> that's right. i went to oakland, california which has the 5th highest crime rate and nearby richmond which is among the top 20 to look at some very innovative technology that they are looking to increase the eyes and ears of the police force on the street. so let's have a look these are some of cali
Comedy Central
Dec 3, 2013 9:30am PST
right out of science fiction. it leaves my with only one question: why does it take so long? i want my stuff now! and i know how to get it. so put on your future hat, jeff bezos because i've cooked up an idea that will bring buying as we know it to a new level. close your eyes and picture this. i'm going to keep my eyes open because i have to read these words here but everybody else, here's the idea. amazon locations that customers can walk into and buy things! (laughter) and the inventory would be arranged not as dropdow dropdows but rows of physical merchandise a customer can actually touch! and instead of waiting precious minutes for a drone to arrive they can place their selections into a wheeled basket conveyance. it's inspired by your web site's abstract cart graphic. (laughter) thus, they have the products instantly. i call it amazon live. call me, bezos. your money and my idea we can have these spending habit opportunity places-- or shops, as i call them-- up and running by 2025. we'll be right back. (cheers and applause) uuuuuuuuuuu (cheers and applause). >> stephen: welcome b
FOX Business
Dec 3, 2013 7:00pm EST
. judith miller, dr. while the ferris join us. also, the latest math, reading and is tied -- science test scores of u.s. students revealing the new promise of a new age of american exceptional as an. the shocking statistics for you in tonight's "chalk talk". we're coming right back. ♪ president obama pushing his troubled health care plan. and he says no matter how much it stinks', it is not going to be repealed. we will be taking that up with congressman and dr. paul brown it has a diagnosis of his own next. ♪ as a business owner, i'm constantly putting out fires. so i deserve a small business credit card with amazing rewards. with the spark cascard from capital one, i get 2% cash back on ery purchase, every day. i break my back around here. finally soone's recognizing me with unlimited rewards! meetings start at 11, cind [ male announcer get the spark business card from capital one. choose 2% cash back or double miles on every purchase, every d. what's in your wallet? i need your timesheets, larry! what's in your wallet? every day we're working to and to keep our commitments. and we'
CSPAN
Dec 6, 2013 6:00pm EST
don't destroy the science to get to the headline. >> you don't distort the science to get to the headline. it you want to follow more of that issue, i recommend an amicus brief. i was involved in with it with the professor in which we recruited a number of distinguished scientists. we could have used more. and attempted so simply explain what the relevant issues on court junk dna were. but the court used it in the opinion nonetheless. it's an interesting brief, and easily obtained so the idea of the scientific safe guards then was those being used were not revealing much more than identity. it was sort of the basic end of the brief as well. privacy laden use of dna. statutes can be changed. supreme court clearly rejected the view in king by saying that once the statutes are in place, we will give a presumption they are followed. what is left after king? one issue is the balancing work the same in cases that are not, quote, seriouses offense. at least four times in the king opinion you see the phrase serious offense never defined. is it descriptive? if it's vital to the balancing,
CSPAN
Dec 7, 2013 12:00am EST
lost from different labs. andft the area of research am now pursuing a career in science policy. i am working with a public education advocacy group in the district. i was wondering if you have any suggestions for early career scientists. how should we keep moving forward in these next couple of years? it is going to remain tough, even if we reach some sort of a deal. are the voice that i am most concerned about. i am glad you are moving in science policy. we need expertise there. many people in your situation would like to continue to do research and are finding it challenging to identify the path forward for them to do so. nih, we're doing everything we can to provide that kind of support. we are increasing the grants that are a bridge between a postdoctoral fellowship and an independent faculty position. we are making it possible for individuals that come in for their first nih grant application to only compete against each other instead of the established investigators that may have more of a track record. trying to give first-time investigators a leg up. thatl have to recogniz
LINKTV
Dec 3, 2013 5:30am PST
chinese city has ranked top in math, reading, and science among teenagers. a new global report says that east asian schools are at the top of academic excellence by tackling tough classrooms and abandoning rote learning. things were not so good for students in the united states. a 15-year-old there jailed in math and were average for reading and science. france is above average in reading and writing but has reading and math, now in 20 fifth place. we leave you with that. you are watching "france 24." >> i am joined on the set by mrs. rush -- -- what is making headlines this morning? >> we start with syria and the question of bashar al-assad. i will go straight away the independent newspaper in the u.k.. bashar al-plicated assad in war crimes. you can see the piece there. the u.n. is keeping full lists of suspected war criminals. the evidence -- until the evidence is requested for an incredible -- four a credible investigation. more broadly on the situation seery, it is a story not being covered as much as usual compared to the events on the ground. when they go to this piece in "the was
SFGTV2
Dec 4, 2013 7:00am PST
will see art and other will see science. all of those is true yet i will effort look at this beautiful span and see the people together who bridged road, art and science and made them soar >> thank you (clapping) and now in keeping of the theme of the great people who have contributed to this bridge i'll introduce my great friend chair of the california transportation commission (clapping). >> thank you amy as chairman of the transportation commission it's a real honor to be here today. i'll to take this moment to recognize and honor all my fellow commissioner who are present today starting with bob bob bobby. commissioner lucy and fran, commissioner joe (clapping) >> i'd like to honor two of our past commissioners x commissioner jerry, and ex-commissioner phil. (clapping). >> i'd like to acknowledge our current and past directors and their staff in keeping this project moving forward. the ct c has plated a big role as established be by the legislature in july 2005. we've been roeptd by four of our executive directors. my colleague on the podium and john who's in the audience
CSPAN
Dec 6, 2013 10:00pm EST
getting the kind of science we needed to make that case and to understand the brain as being the basis of both normal and abnormal behavior. host: the president talking about the brain initiative, calling this the next major american project -- what is he talking about? guest: to put that into context, he was thinking about the last two great american projects in science. one was the apollo project to put a man on the moon. and then the human genome project. the next great american project is what he is calling the brain initiative. and that is an initiative that will involve several government agencies, among them nih and the defense advanced research project agency and the national science foundation as well as private partners to take our understanding of the brain and how it works and bring it up a notch. try to figure out a way to develop the tools to decode the language of the brain. we have gone a long way recently, but we knew -- need to go much further much faster to understand the basis of how the brain works and how it sometimes does not work so well so that you end up with a b
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 573 (some duplicates have been removed)